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Presentation on theme: "Minnesota’s framework for monitoring and supporting the"— Presentation transcript:

1 Minnesota’s framework for monitoring and supporting the
STEM cradle-to-career continuumAllison LiuzziMinnesota Compass, Wilder ResearchSeptember 30, 2014

2 What is MN Compass?A community indicators project, Minnesota Compass provides a common foundation of information and data that people need to identify, understand, and effectively act on community issues.

3 + = Working to change the equation Good intentions
From:+No common base of information=Inefficient decisions

4 + + = Working to change the equation Good intentions
Sound, credible information+Common sense of purpose=Productive decisions for a strong region

5 What is STEM?ScienceTechnologyEngineeringMath

6 PROJECT BACKGROUNDShared information to better understand the state of Minnesota’s STEM cradle-to-career continuum, and to target resources more effectivelyAchievement gapsAspiration gapsWorkforce needsCollaboration between Minnesota Compass and Boston Scientific

7 GOALSProvide a cohesive framework for supporting Minnesota’s STEM cradle-to-career continuum Share a common foundation of knowledge for decision-making Address disparities through actionable data Strengthen the STEM workforce and Minnesota’s economy

8 PROCESSCradle-to-career framework developed with input of advisory committeeConvened more than 70 Minnesota STEM stakeholdersVariety of sectors, including early childhood, K-12 and postsecondary education, informal education, business, policy, research, and foundationsSmaller core advisory group met more frequently to consider feedback

9 ADVISORS3M Foundation 3Ring Augsburg College The Bakken Museum Bemidji State University Bethel University Boston Scientific Boy Scouts Generation Next Girl Scouts Greater Twin Cities United Way High Tech Kids Inver Hills Community College Madigan, Dahl & Harlan PA Metropolitan State University MinnCAN Minneapolis Public Schools Minnesota Business Partnership Minnesota Council of Teachers of Mathematics Minnesota Department of Education Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development Minnesota High Tech Association Minnesota Independent School Forum Minnesota Project Lead the Way Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Minnesota STEM Network NASA & NOAA National Center for STEM Elementary Education Office of Senator Al Franken Osseo Area Schools Rochester Area Math & Science Partnership Rochester Chamber of Commerce Saint Paul Public Schools Science Museum of Minnesota SciMathMN STARBASE Minnesota Thomson Reuters University of Minnesota University of St. Thomas Wilder Research The Works

10 LOGIC MODELA logic model was developed through a literature review and informed by advisory committee input. The model describes important experiences, opportunities, and resources that contribute to developing and sustaining interest and proficiency in STEM. This theoretical framework underlies the indicators chosen and the visual of the STEM cradle-to-career continuum developed for this project.

11 KEY MEASURE CRITERIA1. Relevant and valid. Relates to stated goals and measures what it is intended to measure.2. Consistent over time. Regularly collected the same way.3. Leading. Signals broader changes to come, allowing the community to respond proactively.4. Actionable. Outcomes that can be impacted by programs and policies and change the cradle-to- career trajectory.5. Affordable. Can be collected within project budget. 6. Understandable. Easy for target audience to understand. 7. Comparable. Allows for comparisons by different groups – race/ethnicity, income, gender. 8. Standardized. Allows for comparison with other regions, metro areas, states, or countries. 9. Coherent. Provides coherent picture of progression along the cradle-to-career continuum.The STEM advisory committee suggested a large number of potential key measures to track. All potential key measures were vetted by criteria established for the site, which include scientific qualities as well as being actionable and related to the life cycle of the STEM cradle-to-career continuum.

12 With funding from Boston Scientific, we launched a new STEM section of Minnesota Compass in October. The purpose of the new STEM section of Minnesota Compass is to help us better understand the state of Minnesota’s STEM continuum from cradle to career, and to help us target resources most effectively.The site helps us answer some key questions:How does Minnesota fare on key measures of STEM success from early childhood-career?What are best practices for supporting these measures?Are we making progress over time?

13 When you go to the new STEM section of Minnesota Compass, you’ll see an interactive visual of the STEM cradle-to-career continuum, which brings together the logic model and the key measures selected for this project.Across the top are different segments of the continuum, spanning early childhood to mid-career.The squares in the middle, starting with “Support early learning,” reflect themes that describe important experiences and opportunities at that stage of the continuum.And there are 11 points along the continuum that form the “key measures,” developed with the guidance of advisory groups.You can explore the site by clicking any theme, key measure, or topic of interest on our interactive visual.

14 SEGMENTS ON THE CONTINUUM
When you click on a theme or key measure from the main visual, you enter an expanded section for that segment of the continuum with key measures, benchmarks, disparities and best practices. This information can be used to understand what are important markers of success on the continuum, where we see disparities among different population groups, and strategies that may be effective in supporting students or workers in STEM.

15 CHARTS AND BREAKDOWNSWhen you click on a theme or key measure from the main visual, you enter an expanded section for that segment of the continuum with key measures, benchmarks, disparities and best practices. This information can be used to understand what are important markers of success on the continuum, where we see disparities among different population groups, and strategies that may be effective in supporting students or workers in STEM.

16 SEGMENTS ON THE CONTINUUM
When you click on a theme or key measure from the main visual, you enter an expanded section for that segment of the continuum with key measures, benchmarks, disparities and best practices. This information can be used to understand what are important markers of success on the continuum, where we see disparities among different population groups, and strategies that may be effective in supporting students or workers in STEM.

17 BENCHMARKS, GAPS, AND BEST PRACTICES
When you click on a theme or key measure from the main visual, you enter an expanded section for that segment of the continuum with key measures, benchmarks, disparities and best practices. This information can be used to understand what are important markers of success on the continuum, where we see disparities among different population groups, and strategies that may be effective in supporting students or workers in STEM.

18 That’s just people employed directly in STEM fields.
AN EMERGING STORYThere are almost 455,000 STEM workers in MN, or 17% of MN’s current workforce. We expect to see 79,000 new jobs in STEM over the next decade.That’s just people employed directly in STEM fields.[Allison]From a high-level look at the numbers, we know that STEM education is critical to our future prosperity.In 2012, there were almost 455,000 STEM workers in Minnesota.That’s 17% of the state’s total workforce, and employment in STEM will continue to grow.STEM jobs are expected to grow by 18% in Minnesota in the next 10 years, and we expect to see 79,000 new jobs in STEM in the next decade alone.*And that’s just part of the story. We know that knowledge and skills developed through STEM education are also used in many occupations that may not be categorized as STEM.

19 of 8th graders meet state
60%of 5th gradersmeet statescience standards59%of 8th graders meet statemath standards39%of high school graduates arecollege-readyin math and scienceAnd then moving into high school, we see a need to challenge students through more rigorous coursework and to prepare them with the 21st century skills they will need in higher education and the workforce.* And this is where we see proficiency drop pretty dramatically. Just over one third of high school graduates in our state are college-ready in math and science.And this, in part, explains why 40 percent of our state’s high school graduates who enroll in Minnesota postsecondary institutions need to take one or more remedial courses in college, usually in mathematics (81%).

20 all studentsstudents of colorlower-income studentsall studentsstudents of colorlower-income studentsall studentsstudents of colorlower-income students

21 of 8th graders participate in
57%of 4th graders are highly interestedin science30%of 8th graders participate inextracurricularscience activities10%of high school graduates want tomajor ina STEM fieldin college

22 all studentsstudents of colorlower-income studentsall studentsstudents of colorlower-income studentsall studentsstudents of colorlower-income students

23 54,000 students graduating from Minnesota high schools
I want to round out this story with a message of hope, using demographic projections by race to demonstrate what we COULD see in twenty years if we close gaps in achievement by race.I’ll start with our pool of high school graduates. In 2013, nearly 54,000 students graduated from high schools in Minnesota. Here, we see the state of Minnesota and 54 stick figures, each representing 1,000 graduates from high schools in the state.Source: Minnesota Department of Education

24 17,000 are college-ready in math and science
We narrow our pool of 54,000 total high school graduates to 17,000 who are college-ready in math and science. (This represents the 39% of students who are college-ready.)If we closed gaps by race on this measure of achievement, based on demographic projections for 2030, we could see…Source: ACT, Inc.

25 17,000 20,000 are college-ready in math and science
…an additional 3,000 high school graduates who are college ready in math and science.THIS is a number that’s attainable.It’s ALSO a number that’s impactful.If we take those 3,000 additional students and multiply them out over a decade, we’re looking at an additional 30,000 high school graduates who are college-ready in math and science.I started this presentation by saying that we expect to see 79,000 new job openings in STEM over the next decade. Increasing our number of college-ready high school graduates by 30,000 has the potential to get us a long way toward filling these anticipated new job openings.Source: ACT, Inc.

26 INSPIRING ACTION Policymaker Briefing SciMathMN Policymaker Briefing
R.T. Rybak, Generation NextLegislative Panel, moderated by Steve Kelley, U of MN Senior Fellow:Rep. Sondra Erickson, Republican-lead, Education Policy;Sen. Carla Nelson, ranking minority member, Education Committee;Sen. Patricia Torres-Ray, Chair, Education CommitteeSen. Greg Clausen, Vice Chair, Higher Education and Workforce Development

27 INSPIRING ACTION SciMathMN Policymaker Briefing
R.T. Rybak, Generation NextLegislative Panel, moderated by Steve Kelley, U of MN Senior Fellow:Rep. Sondra Erickson, Republican-lead, Education Policy;Sen. Carla Nelson, ranking minority member, Education Committee;Sen. Patricia Torres-Ray, Chair, Education CommitteeSen. Greg Clausen, Vice Chair, Higher Education and Workforce Development

28 QUESTIONS? Allison Liuzzi Minnesota Compass, Wilder Research E-mail
Connect on Twitter@MNCompass @AllisonLiuzzi

Presentation on theme: "The No Child Left Behind Act Of 2001 Strategies for Improving Teacher Quality Dr. Kathleen Madigan American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence."— Presentation transcript:

1 The No Child Left Behind Act Of 2001 Strategies for Improving Teacher Quality Dr. Kathleen Madigan American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence Archived Information

2 No TEACHER Left Behind  A Highly Qualified Teacher in every classroom by 2005-2006  Increased Flexibility in Funding  NCLB provides funding for professional development, innovative compensation strategies, tenure reform, alternative certification, recruitment and retention innovations, and more!

3 NCLB – Focus on Four Areas to Attract and Retain Highly Qualified Teachers Focus:  Certification Reform  Professional Development  Compensation Strategies  Recruitment Ideas

4 Certification Reform  Reduce Barriers and Increase Standards  Current License requirements are different for each State  Routes to being licensed Traditional College of Education Alternative  Post Bachelors’  Career Changers  Retirees

5 Advantages of Alternative Certification  People coming into teaching through alternative routes tend to be older, people of color, more men, have academic degrees other than education, and have experiences in other occupations.  Early data from several states indicate that individuals entering teaching through alternative routes have higher retention rates than those entering from traditional college based programs.

6 Different types of Alternative Routes to Certification  Internship  College of Education Partnership  American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence

7 What does the American Board offer? Passport Certification – a credential offered to individuals holding a bachelor’s degree or higher, who can pass a background check and a series of rigorous examinations demonstrating subject area mastery and a fundamental knowledge of teaching.

8 Professional Development NCLB : Has some very specific guidelines:  For example, States can use the funds to improve teacher knowledge in one or more of the subjects they teach, increase skills in methods for improving student behavior, or learn how to teach students with disabilities. Yet, one-day or short-term workshops or conferences are no longer considered acceptable professional development experiences.

9 Eight Key Elements  1) All activities are referenced to student learning;  2) Schools use data to make decisions about the content and type of activities that constitute professional development;  3) Professional development activities are based on research-validated practices;

10 Eight Key Elements  4) Subject matter mastery for all teachers is a top priority;  5) There is a long-term plan that provides focused and ongoing professional development with time well allocated;

11 Eight Key Elements  6) Professional development activities match the content that is being instructed;  7) All professional development activities are fully evaluated;  8) Professional development is aligned with state standards, assessment, and the local school curriculum

12 Compensation Strategies Generally three schools of thought— 1.Time on the job, plus coursework = increase in salary 2.Knowledge and Skills = increase in salary 3.Performance = increase in salary

13 The Cincinnati Plan (example of knowledge and skills model)  Under Cincinnati’s new knowledge- and skills-based pay plan, teachers will advance through five levels of professional achievement, earning salary increases based on performance.  Apprentice  Salary: $30,000  Teachers who fail to advance to Novice within two years are terminated  Novice  Salary: $32,000–$35,750  Must be rated 2 or better in all performance and skill categories (on a scale of 1–4)  Teachers who fail to advance to Career within five years are terminated  Career  Salary: $38,750–$49,250  Must be rated 3 or better in all categories  Advanced  Salary: $52,500–$55,000  Must be rated 4 in two categories  Accomplished  Salary: $60,000–$62,000  Must be rated 4 in all categories   (Source: Allan Odden, Education Next, Spring, 2001)

14 Performance Based  School wide Bonus Programs- Based on overall school growth or whether the school met its targets  Individual bonus programs- Based on student achievement and administrator rating  NBPTS  American Board Master Teacher Certification

15 American Board Offers:  Master Teacher Certification – a credential of distinguished achievement for teachers with exceptional subject-area proficiency measured by a rigorous examination and a track record of excellence as demonstrated by student achievement.

16 Recruiting Ideas  Out of Country Washington State has been recruiting teachers from Spain to address its need for bilingual teachers

17 Recruiting Ideas continued…  Teach for America  The New Teacher Project  Troops to Teachers  Teachers-Teachers.com

18 Recruiting Ideas continued…  Housing The Santa Clara Unified School District recently completed construction of a 40-unit apartment complex called "Casa del Maestro," which provides affordable housing to qualified teachers.

19 Recruiting Ideas continued…  The University of Massachusetts-Boston plans to offer free graduate education for prospective teachers in exchange for a commitment to spend three years in a local urban classroom.  UMass-Boston also plans to participate in a statewide effort to recruit prospective teachers from the ranks of studious high- schoolers.

20 Recruiting Ideas continued… Retired—but not really  Both the Georgia and Alaska legislatures recently approved measures that would facilitate bringing retired teachers back to the classroom.  Thirteen principals in Baltimore County plan to retire, then turn right around and be rehired to continue their role as principals. In doing so, they will draw a full salary as well as collect retirement.

21 Recruiting Ideas continued…  Industry In the Arizona desert community of Palo Verde, substitute teachers for the 200- student elementary school were in short supply. Workers from the nearby Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station have trained and volunteered as substitute teachers in an inspiring example of community investment in teaching.

22 No TEACHER Left Behind  A Highly Qualified Teacher in every classroom by 2005-2006  Increased Flexibility in Funding  NCLB provides funding for professional development, innovative compensation strategies, tenure reform, alternative certification, recruitment and retention innovations, and more!

23 The No Child Left Behind Act Of 2001 Strategies for Improving Teacher Quality Dr. Kathleen Madigan

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